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9475 Loveland Madeira Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45242

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featured artwork

Contact us at info@indianhillgallery.com or 513-984-6024 for inquires or to book a viewing on any our featured artwork.

Holland Davidson

The background theme for my art is about loss, beauty, and

anti-fragility. I like finding meaning in the things that are sometimes overlooked and in my work I often reconnect with imagery from the past. The meanings are emotional interpretations of memory; I try to capture the strongest and most visual. I enjoy using personal recollections in my work. Often it reflects upon my years in Florida, and I use motifs and references to juxtapose the old and new. I find Florida to be an always interesting subject, and many of my pieces have reflected on the flora and fauna. I grew up there. I address my subject matter in the most basic manner I can while still having an emotional impact, so my pieces may sometimes appear complex but they retain an overall simplicity and accessibility.

 

Holland Davidson resides in Cincinnati and has exhibited her work professionally since 1993. Her pieces are included in many collections both public and private, and in the Permanent Collection of the Cincinnati Art Museum.  

Ludmila Aristova 

A graduate of Moscow Textile Institute, Ludmila Aristova came to fiber art after a career in fashion design. Her “painting palette” consists of fabric and thread combined to create smooth color and design transitions within an abstract format. Her use of varied fabric textures produces a color spectrum ranging from rich to subtle in effect. About her work, art critic Ed McCormack writes: “Indeed the textures that Aristova achieves with needle and thread can be accurately compared to [Color Field painter Jules] Olitski’s use of painterly impasto to lend his canvases tactile weight and depth. For not only does she combine fabrics such as silk and cotton but also combines hand-painting with dyed materials to create complex chromatic contrasts that are considerably enhanced by painstaking hand-stitching with different colored threads. Indeed, no painter has at his or her disposal a more richly varied arsenal of subtle textural and coloristic effects. … like Kandinsky –– and unlike too many other contemporary artists, who view abstraction in strictly formal terms, forgetting the spiritual sources that inspired that great Russian innovator’s first experiments with nonobjective composition –– Aristova obviously realizes that pure form and color, like music, can be transmitters of emotion.” Aristova’s award-winning works have been included in solo and group exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout the U.S. and abroad. The works, in major museum, and private collections, including the Museum of Arts & Design in New York the All Russia Museum of Applied and Decorative Art in Moscow and others, have also been featured in numerous publications.

Jonathan Eiten 

I am inspired to tell a story!  Antique and organic objects conjure up unique memories and feelings.  I find beauty in the wear and patina of old objects and reflections in glass and silver, and simplicity and humor in whimsical objects.  A still life with a single object is appealing for its balance and focus whereas a painting with multiple objects brings movement and contrast.  

 

In my realistic rendering of objects, I paint so an image can be enjoyed at first glance for its beauty and clarity but work to create depth, so the interest grows upon multiple viewings.  I achieve this through first drawing the image on the panel or canvas and then add a grayscale (black and white) painting to establish the contrasts of light and dark.  I then add layers of color to draw the viewer in to the painting.

Cedric Michael Cox 

My paintings are intended to build bridges between the past, present, and future.  Inspired by elements of cubism and deconstructionism, I combine my interests in music and its relationship to the visual composition. The subjects in my recent works seem to grow like plants with natural and man-made forms interweaving together.  This, along with my increased use of bright color, creates a dreamy and playful quality to my paintings.  My work is a spiritual testimony to the visual experiences that arouse my senses, as I interpret the world around me.

Moshe Rosenthalis

1922 Born in Mariampol, Lithuania, November 18th.
1928-1940 Hebrew School, Mariampol.
1940-1941 Academy of Art, Kaunas, Lithuania.
1942-1945 Lithuanian Unit, The Red Army.
1945-1950 M.A. Academy of Visual Arts, Vilna, Lithuania.
1950 Admission to the Lithuanian Artists’ Association.
1958 Immigrated to Israel.
1965-2008 Primary studio location in Jaffa by the old port.

  

1960-1982 Summered and painted in Safed (in the Galilee Mountains).
1973-1974 Cité des Arts International, Paris.
1977-1978 Asia House, Tel Aviv. Grand scale series (1.6 m x 18 m ): The History of the Jewish People,
 commissioned by Mr. Shaul Eisenberg.
1982 Establishes a secondary residence and studio in Safed.
1987 Changes his signature from: M.Rosenthalis to: M.Rosentalis
2008 Passed away in Tel Aviv, August 26th.
2009 His studio opens as: Rosenthalis House 

credit: http://rosenthalis.co.il/the-color-of-freedom/biography.htm

Dan Biggs 

Dan was well-known for his many eclectic interests, and was actively engaged in the art community through his own art, teaching, and outreach via Frame Designs, his gallery and framing business located in Cincinnati. He was a music and animal lover